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BOSTON PI LIBM 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



Dr. Owen B. Kieman, Commissioner 



ANNUAL REPORT 
of the 

DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 

For the Year Ending June 30, 1959 





BOARD 




of the 


DIVISION OF EMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 


Term Expires 




1962 


Miss Alice W. 0* Connor, Chairman 


I960 


Mr Aris tides Andrade 


1962 


Mr. Joseph P a Raman 


1961 


Miss Constance Garafalo 


1961 


Mrs, Clementina Langone 


I960 


Mrs. Helen Sutton 




SUPERVISOR OF SOCIAL SERVICE 



Mrs. leofilia K. Tattan 



DISTRICT AGENTS 



Mr. Daniel J. Donahue 
Mr. Andrew W. Ansara 
Mr. John A. Mclnnes 
Kr« Edmund B Meduski 



- Fall River Office 

- Lawrence Office 
Springfield office 

- Worcester Office 






ANNUAL REPORT ' 
Year Ending Jane 30, 1959 
of the 
DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 

of the 
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

With the close of the year on June 30, 1959, the Division of Immigration and 

Americanization completed forty-two years of service in fulfilling its duties as 
outlined for the Division under Chapter 69, Section 11 of the General Laws, as 
amended by Chapter 1|09 of the Acts of 1939 which are: 

(1) bring into sympathetic and mutually helpful relations the 
Commonwealth and its residents of foreign origin 

(2) protect immigrants from exploitation and abuse 

(3) stimulate their acquisition and mastery of English - 
(k) develop their understanding of American government, 

institutions and ideals 
(5) generally promote their assimilation and naturalization. 

The Law also described two methods by which the Division may function: 

(1) the Division may cooperate with other officers- and departments of 
the Commonwealth, and with all public agencies, federal, state 

or municipal 

(2) it may investigate the exploitation or abuse of immigrants and in 
making any investigation may require the attendance and testimony 
of witnesses and the production of books and documents pertaining 
to the matter under investigation. 

The Division was "first created as the Bureau of Immigration by an Act of the 
General Court in 1917* In 1919, when the mandate of the Constitutional Convention 
required that all agencies be consolidated into twenty major departments, the 
Bureau of Immigration, with the same powers and duties was transferred to the 
Department of Education. The offices of the Division of Immigration and Americani- 
zation in Boston, Massachusetts were located at the State House until I9I1I when 
the Division was moved to offices at 73 Tremont Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

The fundamental purpose of the work is to bring the residents of foreign 
origin into sympathetic and mutually helpful relationship with the Commonwealth. 
The Division aims to convince the newcomers from every corner of the globe that 
the Commonwealth is their trustworthy friend, counsellor and guide in the many 
perplexities of language, laws and customs that are strange. The main office at 
Boston and the four branches at Fall River, Lawrence, Springfield and Worcester 
operate service bureaus in which professional social workers, experienced in help- 
ing with technical questions of immigration, assist in solving the difficulties 
due to immigration or nationality laws and refer social and domestic problems to 
appropriate social agencies. Social Workers speak the foreign languages of the 
immigrants 5 all have been oriented to the cultural differences of the newcomers 
and are skilled in making the stranger feel at home in America. The number of 

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given services has grown steadily from 18,521 in 1920 to k3,lk9 last year of which 
listed for Boston were* 25,555; Fall River, h 9 173} Lawrence, 3,7U8; Springfield, 
3,996 and Worcester, 5,677. 

FOREIGN BORN STATISTICS 

The United States has received more immigrants since World War II than any 
other country in the world. About three million have come since I9I46 and "three 
fourths of that number settled in nine states - one of them Massachusetts* Since 
19li9, 93,003 immigrants, on arrival into the United States, gave their destination 
as Massachusetts • 10,128 immigrants came to Massachusetts in the year ending 
June 30, 1958 and about that number last year - ending June 30, 1959 o Of the last 
Federal census, 1950, one half of the l*,690,52i4 residents were classified as 
foreign stock, i.e., persons - one- or both of whose parents were foreign born. One 
sixth of the population, 783,277, is listed as foreign born. New England's propor- 
tion of "foreign white stock" population (which combines the foreign born with 
those of foreign and mixed parents) is greater than any other region of the United 
States* Percentages below refer to proportion of foreign born in the total popu- 
lation of the regions as of the 1950 census: 

Ethnic Elements 



New England 


h6£% 


Middle Atlantic 


ia& 


East North Central 


27.0 


West North Central 


20.9 


West South Central 


9.7 


East South Central 


2.3 


South Atlantic 


TJk 


Pacific 


28.7 


Mountain 


19 Jk 



Massachusetts is one of the nine states in which more than 100,000 aliens 
are* registered annually under the Alien Registration Act. In January, 1959, 
129 9 klh aliens registered under the Alien Registration Act. Of this group, New 
York leads with 562, 1*68 and Massachusetts is seventh on this list. The nationali- 
ties of aliens registered in Massachusetts in January, 1959 are: 



Canada 


29^183 


Italian 


18^362 


Polish 


11^289 


United Kingdom 


10,505 


Ireland 


7,325 


Germany 


5,14.63 


U.S.S.R. 


3,h76 


Hungary 


1*228 


All Others 


h2 9 lh3 



- 2 ~ 



Although not aliens, within the past few years, about 10,000 Puerto Ricans 
have come to Massachusetts for permanent residence. Their problems are like those 
of the foreign born because of their lack of knowledge of English. 3,000 are 
settled around Boston. A great many of them came as farm workers and then stayed 
on and brought their families. Others have moved on from New York which is the 
largest settlement of Puerto Ricans on the mainland. Lack of ability to speak 
English has isolated them from the American Community which makes it difficult to 
communicate their needs and to obtain employment. Housing has been a problem also. 

NATIONALITY OF CLIEN1S 

6,968 of our clients of the fifty 'nationalities listed were Italian born, 
although many of these are naturalized. The large number of applicants in this 
category is attributed to the number of Italians who were permitted to come' under 
the Refugee Relief Act of 1953' in force to 1956. Greeks in the amount of 1,793 
listed as served in this state, many were recent arrivals to the United States. 
6,3Ul persons born in the United States were assisted and this number included 
those born in the United States and spent most of their lives abroad. These have 
recently returned to their country of birth and now are sending for their close 
family abroad. Notable among this group are women born in the United States who 
lived many years in Italy and persons born in the United States who have spent 
most of their lives in Poland and now are sending for their families to join them. 
Canadian born clients have numbered ij-,971 and their problems were; sending for 
relatives, travel assistance in getting proper alien registration cards and citi- 
zenship matters, A great number of the 2,5>1J> Irish born- persons were assisted in 
making affidavits to send for relatives from Ireland. 2,7^2 Portuguese born 
persons were assisted and an increase in this nationality is attributed to the 
enactment of the law under which Fayal born persons, victims of the earthquake 
disaster, are being permitted to come to the United States. Relatives are making 
the necessary affidavits. 2,719 Polish born persons were assisted and 1,966 per- 
sons gave Germany as their birthplace. 

The localities of residence of our clients covered about every city and town 
of the Commonwealth. 



BLOOMING THE NEWCOMER 



This office is sent the names of the aliens arriving in Massachusetts and each 
immigrant or family is sent a letter of welcome to the State with the offer of our 
services in matters of adjustment to living in the United States, Our offices had 
some 3,002 contacts in the past year with these newcomers whose problems have been 
such as initiating them to- register under Social Security and Draft, sending for 
their families left abroad, as well as referral to community resources for educa- 
tion and recreation. These newcomers, usually sponsored by close relatives, have 
adjusted well. 

Among the newcomer group, family reunions make up the greatest number. 
Recently admitted immigrants who finally have been able to come to the United 
States under the quota, now make papers and their families are joining them. 

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Notable among them is the Italian spouse who has come and is now sending for his 
family; or the Polish born brother or sister now sending for his family; as well 
as the Lithuanian born brother or sister having waited his turn for the quota 
many years now has his own family join him in the United States from Australia or 
South American countries. From Ireland came mostly the single young man or woman 
sponsored by a relative. Massachusetts is indeed cosmopolitan, 

IMMIGRATION 

9,057 services were given to persons seeking information on matters pertain- 
ing to immigration and reunion of families, as well as information given foreign 
students and persons in the United States on temporary status changing to resi- 
dents of the United States, We made 2,631 affidavits of support for persons send- 
ing for relatives and friends from about every country. 

World tensions and upheavals abroad and economics find many persons seeking 
entrance into' the United States, Ihe small quotas for countries like the'tfliitcd 
Arab Republic, Greece, Portugal, Spain make the wait for quota indefinite, A 
Greek alien admitted to the United States perhaps under the provisions of the 
Refugee Act who now is sending for his wife and child finds that those registered 
on the list in 19^9 are getting their turn. Such a Refugee family is now in 
Poland waiting reunion with the father and husband in the United States, A Greek 
brother registered on the list since 19h6 as a fourth preference category quota 
applicant which status was gained for him by the petition of his U, S, citizen 
brother, is still waiting his turn, Ihis same situation exists in a case of 'a 
Spanish born sister waiting her turn since 19h6 to come to the United States, 

l5li,657 immigrants are permitted to the United States under the quota system 
which was continued by the 7/alter McCarran Act of 1952 • The quota for any country 
is a minimum of 100 but the total for a country is figured on the formula of one 
sixth of one per cent of the number of people in the Continental United States, as 
of the Census of 1920, Because of the changing of the nature of our population 
since 1920, there are many advocates for a change of the quota system mainly that 
the use of the 1950 census would be a fairer solution. Under the present system, 
countries with the largest quotas as Great Britain, Ireland have never filled 
their allotment and the numbers are unused* 

The Act of September 11, 1957 somewhat eased the situation by removing mort- 
gages on quotas created by the Displaced Persons Act of 19l|£, Countries, as 
Czechoslovakia, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, etc,, with small quotas and which 
mortgaged quotas' up to the year 2000, benefited. However, there is the situation 
at present of 63,669 applicants awaiting their turn in the fourth preference cate- 
gory of the Italian quota which is 5,61*5 annually. The number assigned to this 
category is 25$ 'of quota numbers not used for the first, second and third prefer- 
ence categories. In Portugal, there are 2,1|66 such registrants recorded against 
the annual quota of U38, Extremely long lists are recorded in countries like 
Greece and Spain and most of Europe, 'In the Second Preference category, those 
for parents of United States citizens, and to whom 30$ of the annual quota is 
assigned, there is a great backlog in many countries. For the Greek quota there 

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are 1*,568 such registrants against the annual quota of 308 • A parent must wait 
over two years to get his turn to join his U. S. citizen family in the united 
States • Turkish born parents and those of other countries have the same situation # 

ORPHANS 

The close of the year June 30, 1959 brought to an end the provisions of the 
law to admit orphans into the United States* We assisted some ten applicants in 
filling necessary forms, affidavits of support and had correspondence with the 
U# S. Consuls* Among them were four cases of Greek children adopted abroad'who 
came to their waiting parents, Two girls from Poland, aged 11 and 12 years, came 
to their uncle and family* An infant baby came from Portugal after the adoptive 
parents went there and chose the child* Even though this law was in force two 
years, the closing days of the law found several cases incomplete because of 
travel documents abroad which had not been issued* 



FAMILY REUNIONS UNDER SPECIAL LAW 

Section"6, also, of P.L. 85-316" which concerned Tubercular spouses, parents, 
also expired. Of the ten spouses which our office assisted in coming to the 
United States under the provisions of that lav/, eight have been already released 
after admission and treatment and further examination at the State hospitals* 

Die waiver of criminal records under Section 5 of that law has served to re- 
unite several long separated families* A Cape Verde born husband had been deport- 
ed in 19^)1 because he had admitted perjury when he claimed he was Brazilian born 
in making applications to enter the United States without quota. His wife had 
come to the United States under U* S. citizenship she acquired through her father. 
She brought the children but the family would still be separated except for this 
provision of the law. Several very old immigration cases were finally adjusted 
with the waiver and pre examination privileges, as in the cases of the Russian born 
man who had lived in the United States most of his life. He was found deportable 
because of conviction of two crimes involving moral turpitude. He could not be 
deported because he was unable to get a birth record. The invocation of the 
waiver plus the procedure of "preexamination" permitted him to depart from the 
United States for a trip to Canada, get his visa and then stay reunited with his 
citizen wife and children. 



OTHER TMI.ttGRATTON LAW PROVISIONS 

Preexamination privileges are no longer allowed since June 30, 1°5 Q * Under 
this procedure, the Uc S, Consul in Canada, after review of the file and receipt 
of the necessary clearances would give an appointment to a person for issuance of 
immigrant visa. The U. S, Immigration Service then after examination gave the 
alien a letter which assured his entrance into Canada and return to the United 
States. The termination of this procedure has left many applicants in a dilemma* 
Many of our change of status cases who had been able to adjust to permanent resi- 
dence in that manner, now face going abroad for issuance of visas. Some skilled 

-5- 



professionals whoso services were necessary in the United States have been accorded 
first preference category* Others are husbands of U, S, citizens in the United 
States on temporary status who must depart and get a visa for legal' residence. 
However, with the small quota of countries like China, Korea, Spain, India, Greece, 
etc,, no numbers are available for adjustment of status in the United States© 
Already we have cases in - process with applications being made at Consulates in 
Aruba, Dutch West Indies, Kingston, Jamaica, Nassau, Bahamas. 

Of the 390 Change of Status cases we handled, many were for persons of skills 
whose services were required by firms, others were persons who had entered the 
United States as students or visitors and who in the meantime had married United 
States citizens. Some were those who came as non- immigrants and decided to stay 
with their relatives in the United States, Since a quota number was available, as 
in the case of persons born in Great Britain, application was made, procedure com- 
pleted and resulted in residence in the United States, Our social workers and 
district agents are licensed to appear at the U, $• Immigration hearings with such 
clients and accompany the clients to the hearings. 

On September 2, 1958, Congress enacted P,L, 85-892 which permits entrance of 
1500 visas to nationals or citizens' of Portugal who because of natural calamity in 
the Azore Islands since September 1, 1957 are out of their usual place of abode in 
such islands and unable to return to their former homes. They must be in urgent 
need of assistance for essentials of life, This legislation will permit 1^00 
applicants, plus their families to come outside the quota. We have made a number 
of affidavits for persons to come under this provision. Privately chartered 
planes' with many of these immigrants have been admitted at Logan Airport, East 
Boston, Massachusetts, This law expires June 30, i960. 

Under the law of August 5, 1958, P» L, 85-616 - permitting- persons who are in 
the United States prior to June 28, l$kO to adjust their status, we have assisted 
fourteen persons to become permanent legal residents. They now await the neces- 
sary length of time to become United States citizens. One of- the cases was that 
of an Italian who had come to the United States as a stowaway, June 28, 192k 9 but 
he could never prove it by written evidence. Since this law makes him prove resi- 
dence since 19k0 9 he was able to comply with the requirements. The statistical 
sheet' attached shows the other various services givenj making petitions for rela- 
tives, helping the aliens with address 'report cards, required annually, filling 
change of address cards when they move, as well as assisting persons in filling 
forms and procedure to verify their age for their application for Social Security 
Pensions. 

FUTURE LEGISLATION 

As 'this report is being concluded, new immigration legislation is being 
enacted, 

/ 

The orphan law is being extended for another year. It has additional provi- 
sions making it necessary for the Immigration Service to investigate and approve 
the petitions even for children who were adopted abroad, 

« 6 — 



The law to permit persons with Tuberculosis to join their immediate families 
is being renewed. The same provisions of arranging for hospital care and 'giving 
definite assurance against them be coming 'public charges still is in force. Under 
H. R. 58^6, it is estimated that some 57*000 close relatives will benefit. This 
law was passed to reunite the families who came under the Refugee Relief Act and 
who are waiting for their turn in the quota for a long time. It changes the 
category of some immigrants from fourth to second class, as unmarried children 
over 21 years of age of united States citizens. This law will without doubt in- 
crease our work with this group of persons as there are many registrants whom we 
have been assisting to come to the United States, 

In the last session of Congress, some twenty bills were introduced regarding 
Immigration Law changes and Refugees, None, except the above oentioned has boon 
enacted. It" is expected with the designation of Refugee Year, July 1, 1959 to 
July 1, i960, that some legislation favoring Refugees may be enacted later. 

CITIZENSHIP 

h 9 l$3 persons were naturalized in the State of Massachusetts, Our statistics 
show that we have filled 2,589 applications in this category. The Federal 
Government is sending to persons eligible for citizenship reminders to be naturali- 
zed. As a result, we have more' applications recently. There are still a number 
of persons in the United States, long time residents, who are fearful of the 
examination, etc., and have not been naturalized. A: f ew of the more recently 
arrived immigrants are naturally so inclined although they are alert to take the 
privilege of naturalization as soon as possible. 

Although Declaration of Intentions, or First Papers, are no longer required, 
we assisted in filling 369 such applications. Doctors, nurses who seek to take 
the Massachusetts examinations to be registered must have such Declarations and 
it is required by some employers who have government contracts. Persons who 
gained citizenship through parentage or marriage and making application for cer- 
tificates in their own right, numbered 7H« The recent rulings changing the 
length of required residence for children, under some conditions, permitting them 
eligibility for such citizenship if they come to the United States up to the age 
of 23, has increased the applicants in this category. 

We have had several favorable rulings in the cases of several United States 
born persons of Italian and Portuguese ancestry who had lived abroad since child- 
hood and for whom it had been ruled had lost United States citizenship by military 
service in those countries. The ruling in the Nishikawa case has helped four of 
our clients and they have been adjudicated as citizens of the United States. 



COOPERATION WITH OTHER AGENCIES 

The Division cooperates with social agencies, public and private, We have 
referrals from the Division of Public Welfare, Registrar of Voters and Social 
Security Offices, as well as other State offices, to give special technical infor— 

- 7 * 



mation on citizenship and immigration problems and translation service. V7e have 
many contacts with the various sponsoring agencies working with refugees and our 
relations have been most cooperative and mutually helpful. Close contact and 
constant cooperative relationship with the Adult Civic Education Groups of the 
Commonwealth are maintained and, as a member of the Committee for the Foreign Born 
of the United Community Services, we participate in meetings and problems of the 
foreign born. Relations with the Federal Immigration and Naturalization Service 
continue with cooperation and assistance. 

The increasing numbers of calls for our services without publicity or adver- 
tising of our work points out the need of our services. The Ways and Means 
Committee of 1959 has cut out two positions from our formerly authorized nineteen 
positions and necessarily we shall not be able to give our former number of 
services. 



REFUGEE YEAR 

July 19^9 to July i960 has been designated as Refugee Year and President 
Eisenhower in his proclamation issued for the occasion, summarised the World 
Refugee Year Aim as: 

"to focus interest on the refugee problem; to encourage 
additional financial contributions from governments, 
voluntary agencies, and the general public for solution 
of the problem, and to provide additional opportunities 
for permanent refugee solutions, through voluntary repa- 
triation, resettlement or integration, with due regard 
for humanitarian consideration and in accordance with 
the freely expressed wishes of the refugees themselves." 

It is estimated that in Austria, Germany, Greece and Italy there are 30,000 
Refugees still in camps. 100,000 unsettled out of camp Refugees are in the above 
countries and in Belgium, France - , Netherlands and Turkey. There are one million 
Arab Refugees in U^A.R., Lebanon, Syria and Jordan, pending political settlements. 
170,000 Algerian Refugees in Tunisia' and Morocco, one million Refugees in Hong 
Kong from the Chinese Mainland and 9,500 European Refugees still remain on the 
Chinese mainland. 

lb study the situation and relieve the conditions, the United States Committee 
for Refugees was established in the fall and winter of 1958 and has set itself 
these tasks: 

. to inform the public about world refugee issues. 

• to consult regularly with Government leaders and UN officials. 
» to stimulate research on refugee problems. 

• to work closely with American voluntary agencies in the 'refugee field. 

• to further American participation in World Refugee Year. 



-. 8 - 



and recommends : 

« A Federal appropriation of $10 million over and above present 
outlays refugee programs, 

• Generous government allocation of additional surplus commodities. 

• New legislation permitting the annual immigration of 20,000 refugees 
beyond those authorized by existing quotas* 

• Intensified action by voluntary agencies in their continuing programs 
and in their efforts to raise from the American people during the Year 
at least $20 million over their normal campaign goals for refugee aid. 

With the close of Congress, 1959* no legislation was enacted, but it is 
expected that Congress will enact some laws for the relief in this ever present 
world situation. 

Further interest in Refugees is manifested by a Massachusetts Committee under 
the U. S. Committee for Refugees. The subject of Refugees is a topic of discussion 
for a morning meeting being arranged for the Massachusetts Social Workers Conference 
to be held this Fall. The Division is taking part in this conference, and no doubt 
should a law be enacted to assist refugees to come from abroad, we shall assist 
relatives in making necessary assurances as we have done under all preceding laws. 

FALL RIVER 

The fiscal year closed on June 30, 19^9 with the Fall River Office recording 
a total of !*,173 services rendered to persons residing in the Southeastern 
Massachusetts area. The total of h,173 services is an increase over the previous 
fiscal year and the records show that the workload in this area is increasing each 
and every year. For example, liiere v/as an increase in the petitions for naturali- 
zation. There was an increase in applications for certificates of citizenship and 
also an increase in petitions for issuance of immigration visas and in other immi- 
gration and naturalization forms. 

This office had a total of 39 change of status cases as compared to 18 in the 
previous fiscal year. This type of case constitutes numerous documentations, 
numerous forms and a good deal of worki I have appeared at jL0 hearings as com- 
pared to l[ in the previous fiscal year. It might be added that I only appear at 
hearings where I am urgently needed in anticipation of a serious nature, I have 
the opportunity of appearing at all change of status hearings, however, most of 
my appearances at hearings were connected with special inquiries; suspension of 
deportation; deportation cases and some change of status cases. 

This office 'has prepared appeals to the Board of Immigration Appeals at 
Washington, D. C. and on two occasions have met with* favorable action. An appeal 
was made to the Board of Review, Department of State, regarding a Certificate of 
Loss of Nationality, This Board reversed a previous administrative decision that 
the subject had expatriated himself and the native born visitor from Portugal was 
able to remain in the United States; retain his United States citizenship #nd have 
his wife and four children join him in the United States. This particular case 
took approximately nine months before reaching a successful conclusion. 

- 9 - 



My weekly visits to New Bedford, Massachusetts are busy days and employ a 
full schedule. It might be added that there is no State Immigration and .Americani- 
zation Office in operation in that city since 1939 nor has there been* any Federal 
Immigration and Naturalization Service Office in operation since 1953 • 

There is an expansion in population in the Southeastern Massachusetts area, 
particularly noticeable on Cape Cod where the Otis Air Force Base has been expand- 
ing rapidly , Numerous cases are from that area* 

With the enactment of new legislation concerning the* orphans act and reunion 
of families under H, R, 5896, it appears that this office, like the others of the 
Division, will have a* heavier workload in this in the present fiscal year which 
terminates on June 30, I960, 

LAWRENCE OFFICE 

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1959, the Lawrence District office 
rendered a total of 3 ,lhfi services to clients , Ihis is an increase of h$h services 
over the previous fiscal year* This Agent "came to the Lawrence Office in January 
1959 in transfer from the Worcester office. 

Information on immigration laws and procedures was the service most frequently 
requested by clients during the fiscal* year 1959 • The second most frequent service 
rendered was the writing of letters to, for and about clients. Answering questions 
pertaining to citizenship was the third most frequent service given. 

During the fiscal year ending in June. 1959* the Lawrence District office was 
in contact with clients representing over hi different nationalities* Italy was ' 
the country most frequently represented, Canada was second with the United States, 
Poland, Great Britain, Greece and Lebanon following in that order. 

Clients residing in kk localities throughout the Commonwealth were served by 
the Lawrence District office during the past fiscal year. The largest number of 
clients were residents of Lawrence proper, Lowell had the second greatest number 
of individuals served „ This can be attributed to 'the fact that in April of 1959* 
this agent commenced visiting Lowell for services, Each visit was preceded by 
excellent coverage through the local press and radio. The churches and several 
nationality organizations in Lowell were also notified of this agent's visits to 
that cityi Interviews in Lowell have been held at the Civil Defense office in 
City Hall, This agent has received excellent cooperation from the Lowell city 
officials, especially by the City Manager and the Civil Defense Director, 

Other cities well represented by clients 'during the past fiscal year were 
Methuen, Andover, Haverhill and North Andover, 

The Lawrence District office has continued to maintain excellent relations 
with the private, city, state and federal agencies in the area, 

Beside the assistance rendered individuals with problems relating to immigra- 
tion and citizenship, the Lawrence District office performed a variety of ether 
functions during the last fiscal year: 

- 10 - 



All newcomers to the area were sent letters of welcome. News items pertaining 
to various aspects of the immigration and naturalization laws appeared in the 
Lawrence and Lowell newspapers initiated by this office* 

The District Agent attended all the naturalization sessions at the Lawrence 
Superior Court, 

Individuals with health, employment and personal problems were interviewed 
and referred to the proper agencies. 

Newcomers who spoke Italian, Arabic, French or German but no English were 
relieved to be able to discuss 'their problems in their native language with the 
workers in the Lawrence office. 

This office counselled many new arrivals regarding life in America, thus 
affording them an opportunity to adjust more readily to their environment . 

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SPRINGFIELD OFFICE 

During the past fiscal year 3,996 persons were recorded as having received 
services at the Springfield office. Ihis figure does net represent the unrecorded 
services given daily by telephone to individuals and agencies located in the four 
Western counties of our state. Since the closing in 1955 of the local office of 
the united States Immigration and Naturalization Service, requests by telephone 
have increased tremendously. This has been especially true during the past year. 

The statistics snow that the District Agent personally handled 91 per cent of 
the recorded services. In addition to performing the above duty and caring for 
the general management of the office, he was called upon to train two nevr clerks. 
One appointed on a provisional appointment for a period of 6 months, and the 
other a permanent appointee approved by the Civil Service Commission January 1, 
1959 ♦ 

The statistics show that we assisted persons from 1*6 countries with natives 
of Canada heading the list. P G rsons born in the United States, Germany, Italy, 
Poland, Great Britain and Ireland made up the major nationalities. 

Individuals came to our office from h$ localities within our district. V/e 
had contact with $\\ persons former residents of our state, now residing elsewhere 
in the United States. 

During the year 188 letters were sent to new immigrants destined to our area 
welcoming them to our Commonwealth and inviting them to call upon us for any assis- 
tance they might need to help adjust themselves to their new life in America. The 
response to these letters was most gratifying this year. Inquiries came to us 
from these people asking "for advice about citizenship, educational opportunities, 
employment and the sponsoring of other members of their family. A number of young 
men of -military age sought advice about enlistment in the Armed Forces in prefer- 
ence to waiting to be called by Selective Service. One of these, a young man born 

- 11 - 



countryj offices of the United States government 'in foreign countries; and the 
Immigration and Naturalization Service in Bo3ton. The newcomers seem to appre- 
ciate a slowj polite interview. Possibly a courtesy they did not enjoy in their 
home country* 

From the different- ethnic groups the Italians, Americans, Canadians, Poles, 
Britishers, Lithuanians, Germans and Greeks requested the most services in that 
order. The people of Italian descent, in this district, are very persistent in 
their efforts of sponsoring their friends and relatives, even though they know 
that the quota is filled, or it involves a long wait. They keep inquiring about 
pending legislation before Congress, The fairly liberal policy of the Polish 
government concerning migration and travel, keeps up the hopes of this fairly 
large nationality group in the Worcester Area. Travel to and from Canada continues 
at a lively pace. 

On June l£, 1959, the Agent was the featured speaker at the commencement 
exercises held at the Lamartine Street School, Worcester, Massachusetts for the 
aliens studying how to road, write and speak the English language. The graduation 
class was proud to recite patriotic themes in their new language, as well as to 
perform a colorful Greek folk dance for the guests in attendance. 



- 13 - 





STATISTICAL DETAIL 
SERVICES GIVEN 

1 Year: 7/1/58 - 6/30/59 

INFORMATION 


o 

H 
fc 

se; 

8 

8 


FALL RIVER 
OFFICE 


w 
s 


SPRINGFIELD 
OFFICE 


« H 


a 

\A -X I 
<d O co 

P wir\ 
Q H Os 
& fr-, fH 


Fisca 


8lb5 


2032 


1673 


2338 


An 


1 Offices 


I. 


bob5 


18,233 




1, Booklets, forms, blanks 

2 , Citizenship 


1298 


292 


17 b 


b6l 


311 


23536 




" 10^8 


' 898 


515 


^90 


115C 


b',b£L 




3 • Immigration 


5065 


5&U 


76« 


73b 


1926 


9,057 




km Travel 


190 


7U 


115 


225 


b"66 


1,078 




5, Other 


' 5b6 


20U 


101 


zv 


192 


1,071 


II. 


FORMS FILLED 


6095 


88b 


703 


63$ 


760 


9,077 




6. N-105 


3k 


b 


3 


3 


9 


53 




7 . N-300 


310 


9 





13 


29 


'369 




8. N~b00 


1761 


301 


115 


212 


200 


2,589 




9, N~600 


kl9 


~ wr~ 


37 


62" ' 


hi 


711 




10 # N-585"" 


160 


1 " 


' 10 


^ ' 7 


5' 


' 163 




11, Other Nat'ur. Forms 


173 


27 


-- - 20 


31 


26 


277 




12, 1-131 


wr 


1 


5 


9 


' "8" 


167 




13, 1-133 


312 


9k 


Ti 


U5 


' " " '63 


'755 




lb. Other Immig. Forms 


1098 


21U 


lb7 


66 


122 


l,6b7 




15; AR-ll 


2«9 


lit 


58 


~67T 


w 


U87 




16, 1-90 


373 


' U3 


13" 


"Hi 


k9 


-512 




17, AR-53 or 5U 


762 


90 


2U6 


85 


lbb 


1,327 


Ill, 


EXECUTION OF AFFIDAVITS 


2i;85 


1*67 


37b 


298 


295 


3,919 




18, Affidavit of support 


2097 


135 


122 


96 


181 


2,631 




19 • Affidavit of facts 


a 


9 


33 


U 


9 


' 67 




20. Other notarial 


3»0 


323 


219 


19U 


10b 


1,220 




21, Assurances 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


IV. 


OTHER SERVICES 


6903 


558 


869 


167 


bll 


8,908 




22, Change of Status 


279 


39 


2b 


22 


26 


390 




23 • Appearance at hearings 


"20lj. 


l« 


7 


- 


b 


'233 




2b» Interpretation & Trans, 
25, Letters 


' 7bb 


11 


151 


- 


128 


l',03k 




5569 


bb~2 


603 


Ibb 


252 


7,010 




26, Other 


107 


m 


8b 


1 


1 


2bl 


V. 


INTERVIEW 


1927 


232 


129 


558 


166 


3,012 




27, Newcomer Interview 


1916 


232 


129 


558 


166 




3,001 




28, Refugee Interview 


11 


- 


- 


- 


- 


11 






2$&$ 


b,173 


3,7b8 


3,996 


5,677 


b3,lb9 



Fiscal lear 



1. 
2. 
3. 
k. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 

9. 
10. 

11* 
12. 
13. 
111. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 

19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
21. 

25. 
26. 

27. 

28. 

29. 
30. 

31. 

32. 

33. 
3k. 
35. 
36. 

37. 

38. 

39. 

Uo. 

la. 

U2. 

U3. 

Ui. 

l£. 

1*7. 

1*8. 

to. 

50. 

51. 

52. 

53. 

51*. 

55. 
56. 



-1959 


NATIONALITY AM) ETHNIC STATISTICS 


A 

WOR 

CESTER 


11 Offices 




BOSTON 


FALL 
RIVER 


IAWRENCE 


SPRING- 
FIEID 


TOTAL 


Albania 


80 


mm 


6 


.. 


85 


171 


Africa 


76 


2 


5 


5 


2 


bit 


Armenia (R. or T.; 


81 


- 


59 


- 


Hit 


"25lt ' 


Australia 


3bW 


- 


19 


k 


9 


"lltl 


Austria 


m 


6 


25 


30 


5 


210 


Belgium 


98 


3 


31 


20 


6 


350 


Bulgaria 


12 


•M 


- 


- 


- 


• 12 


Canada 


2066 


22U 


591 


600 


682 


It, 971 


Central America 


306 


23 


— 


11* 


17 


360 


China 


570 


134 


ftl 


16 


56 


855 


Czechoslovakia 


91 





1 


11 


U 


115 


Denmark 


33 


5 


1 


9 


16 


bit 


Egypt 


72 


7 


- 


- 


1 


80 


Estonia 


16 


•m 


. 


6 


2 


?-k 


Finland 


87 


4 


- 


5 


73 


169 


France 


3k3 


34 


6U 


55 


87 


563 


Germany 


1072 


73 


T*7 


39k 


280 


l-,966 


Great Britain 


988 


no 


212 


337 


33U 


U?b9 


Greece 


1076 


Bit 


193 


20b" 


232 


1 3 793 


Hungary 


39k 


1 


97 


10 


73 


5«3 


Iceland 


8 


- 


3 


- 


- 


11 


India 


166 


- 


- 


B 


21 


195 


Indonesia 


19 


- 


T" 


*M 


12 


36 


Iran 


k3 


- 


11 


2 


13 


69 


Iraq 


2U 


- 


1 


- 


- 


" 25 


Ireland 


1963 


28 


" 55 ' 


283 


106 


2,515 


Israel 


60 


m 


U 


3 


15 


' 82 


Itaty 


klk5 


82 


693 


387 


1061 


6,968 


Japan 


163 


3$ 


5 


51 


21 


275 


Jordan 


k3 


- 


5 


2 


- 


50 


Korea 


05 


mm 


6' 


- 


' 33 


12 k 


Latvia 


156 


" 7 


- 


2 


7 


202 


Lithuania 


1*17 


3 


71 


12 


283 


786 


Mexico 


k5 


- 


5 


3 


Ik 


67 


Netherlands 


'151' 


b 


16 


16 


28 


219 


New Zealand 


5 


- 


1 


- 


2 


8 


Norway 


133 


170 


1 


- 


15 


319 


Pakistan 


13 


M 


- 


1 


7 


21 


Palestine 


15 


- 


9 


k 


6 


3k 


Philippines 


251 


U5 


12 


5 


11 


'32k 


Poland 


1299 


209 


203 


377 


551 


2,719 


Portugal 


561 


1996 


120 


k9 


16 


2,7U2 


Rumania 


35 


- 


lb 


18 


3 


' 7k' 


South America 


370 


26 


16 


32 


52 


U96 " 


Spain 


106 





28 


7 


21 


170 


Sweden 


125 


13 


7 


16 


81 


2k2 


Switzerland 


105 


- 


2 


k 


11 


122 


Syria & Lebanon 


159 


3k 


195 


62 


178 


628 


Turkey (Not Armenia) 


269 


b 


35 


26 


33 


371 


Trieste 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Ukraine 


59 


16 


1 


25 


1 


102 


U.S.S.R. 


622 


32 ~ 


60 


87 


04 


'865 


United States 


3818 


730 


551 


5o8 


726 


6,32*1 


West Indies 


670 


3 


k 


11*9 


37 


863 


Yugoslavia 


183 


3 


2 


9 


30 


227 


Other Countries 


•122 


' 3 


• 31 


108 


30 


-29U 




25,555 


U,173 


3,72*0 


3,996 


5,677 


1*3,12*9 



Fiscal Year 



1953 - 1959 


L C A L I 


TIES 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


All Offices 




BOSTON 


FALL 
RIVSR 


IAWRENCE 


WORCESTER 


TOTAL 


Abington 


13 


mm 


IM 




** 


13 


Acton 


lb 


m 


- 


- 


— 


lT" 


Acushne-T 


- 


37 


- 


- 


- 


37 


Adams 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


Agawam 


•H 


tm 


- 


72 


- 


72 


Amesbury 


11 


- 


11 


- 


- 


22 


Amherst 


15 


- 


- 


10 


- 


"T5" 


Andover 


IB 


- 


251 


- 


- 


269 


Arlington 


318 


2 


it 


- 


- 


32/4 


Ashburnham 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Ashland 


h 


- 


- 


- 


- 


U 


Athol 


? 


- 


- 


- 


1 


« 


Attleboiro 


ut 


56 


<- 


- 


- 


70 


Auburn 


i 


- 


- 


- 


bit 


65 


Avon 


i 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Ayer 


200 


- 


- 


- 


5 


205 


Barnstable 


28 


23 


.. 


mm 


— 


51 


Bar re 


1 


mm 


- 


- 


k 


5 


Bedford 


5? 


- 


2 


- 


- 


59 


Belchertown 


2 


- 


- 


2 


- 


k 


Bellingham 


3 


3 


- 


- 


- 


6 


Belnont 


251+ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


25U 


Berkley- 


- 


h 


- 


- 


- 


U 


Berlin 


h 


- 


- 


- 


3 


7 


Beverly 


»U 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Bit 


Billerica 


27 


- 


32 


- 


- 


59 


Blacks tone" 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Boston 


11,520 


2 


«9 




10 


11,621 


Bourne 


9 


25 


- 


2 


- 


36 


BoxforcT" 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Boylston 


- 


- 


mm- 


- 


21 


21 


Brain tree 


61 


- 


- 


- 


- 


61 


Bridgewater 


29 


— 


M 


- 




29 


Brimfield 


6 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


Brockton 


m " 


- 


- 


- 


- 


313 


Brookfield 


2 


- 


- 


- 


6 





Brookline 


133 


- 


- 


- 


- 


733 


Burlington 


1U 


- 


- 


- 


- 


111 


Cambridge 


1887 


6 


1 


im 


mm 


1*891* 


Canton 


62 


2 


- 


*m 


— 


bit 


Carlisle 


1 


M* 


Mi 


- 


- 


1 


Carver 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Charlton 


- 


- 


- 


- 


12 


12 


Chatham 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Chellmsfbrcl 


5 


- 


16 


- 


•m 


' 21 


Chelsea 


22l 


- 


13 


- 


- 


2U0 

















Fiscal Year 
19*8 - 1959 


BOSTON 


FALL 
RIVER 


IAVilRENCE 


SPRING- 
FIEID 


WORCESTER 


TOTAL 


Cheshire 


16 


mm 


M 


- 


- 


16 


Chic ope e 


3 


n 


- 


m 


- 


)i/>6 


Clarksburg 


- 


- 


- 


i 


• 


*1 


Clinton 





M 


- 


- 


5o 


5U 


CohasseTi 


21 


- 


- 


tm 


- 


21 


Concord 


BU 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Bit 


Dalton 


m 


gp 


.. , 


3 


m 


3 


Danvers 


22 


- 


25 


•M 


- 


U7 


DartmoulTi 


U 


76 


- 


- 


- 


130 


Dedham 


93 


- 


- 


- 


- 


93 


Deerfieid' 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Dighton 


- 


17 


- 


- 


- 


17 


Douglas 


1 


- 


«■> 


- 


3 


U 


Dover 


21* 


- 


1 


- 


— 


25 


DracuTi 


12 


aw 


5b 


- 


- 


6y 


Dudley 


5 


- 


mm 


- 


31* 


39 


Duns table 


1 


Ml 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Duxbury 


U7 


- 


- 


- 


- 


U7 


East Longmeadow 


mm 


^ , 


ma 


17 


Ma 


17 


Easthampton 


7 


- 


- 


16 


- 


23 


Easton 


25 


- 


- 


- 


- 


28 


Essex 


3 


- 


3 


- 


M 


6 


Evere£E 


31b 


- 


5 


- 


- 


321 


Fairhaven 


9 


101 


„, 


ri . 


„. 


'110 


Fall River 


15 


2032 


— 


- 


- 


2,01+7 


Falmouth 


51 


21 


- 


- 


- 


72 


Fitchburg 


30 


- 


- 


- 


Id 


UO 


Foxboro 


6 


- 


- 


•n 


- 


6 


Framingh'sm" 


W 




2 


- 


- 


151 


Franklin 


60 


- 


- 


- 


i 


61 


Gardner 


13 


mu 


— . 


1 


n 


25 


Georgetown 


2 


mm 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Gloucester 


100 


k 


- 1 


- 


- 


10U 


Grafton 


2 


- 


- 


- 


78 


BO' 


Granby 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


2 


Great Barring-ton 


1 


M 


- 


1 


M 


2 


Greenfield 


- 


- 


- 


6 


- 


6 


Groton 


9 


- 


" 1 


- 


1 


11 


Grove land 


5 


- 


2 


- 


- 


7 


Hadley 


2 


„. 


.„ 


2 


-- 


b 


Halifax 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Hamilton 


1U 


- 


2 


- 


- 


16 


Hampden 


- 


- 


■a 


1 


- 


1 


Hanover 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 ' 


Hanson 


17 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17 


Hardwick 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6^ 


65 


Harvard 


35 


- 


- 


- 


- 


35 

















..-•; 



Fiscal Year 
1958 - 1959 


BOSTON 


FALL 
Rr/ER 


LAWRENCE 3 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


WORCESTER 


TO131L 


Harwich 


I* 


6 


m 


_ 


. 


10 


Haverhill" 


60 


- 


261 


- 


- 


321 


Hingham 


hk 


- 


- 


- 


■M 


W 


Hinsdale 


- 


- 


~ 


1 


- 


1 


Holbrook 


31 


- 


- 


- 


- 


31 


Holden 


1 


- 


- 


- 


79 


""BO 


Hollisloh 


23 


- 


- 


- 


- 


23 


Holyoke 


13 


- 


- 


359 


- 


372 


Hopedale 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Hopkinton 


8 


- 


+m 


- 


3 


11 


Hubbardstbn 


- 


- 


- 


— 


k 


h 


Hudson 


36 


- 


- 


- 


~ 


36 


Hull 


12 


- 


- 


- 


- 


12 


Ipswich 


11 


mm 


1 


mm 


^ m 


12 


Kingston 


2 


mm 


rT 


_ 


mm 


2 


Lake vi lie 


1 


mm 


p— 


«_ 


mm 


1 


Lancaster 


U6 


- 


- 


- 


12 


' 5S 


Lanesboro 


2 


- 


- 


1 


- 


3 


Lawrence 


53 


- 


1921; 


- 


6 


1,983 


Lee 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


Leicester 


- 


- 


- 


- 


59 


59 


Lenox 


2 


- 


- 


13 


- 


15 


Lean ins ter 


30 


- 


- 


- 


3 


21 


Lexington 


110 


- 


- 


- 


- 


110 


Lincoln 


19 


- 


- 


- 


- 


19 


Littleton 


7 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7 


Longmeadow 


- 


- 


- 


75 


- 


75 


Lowell 


bo- 


- 


390 


- 


3 


1*81 


Ludlow 


ld 


- 


- 


W 


- 


107 


Lunenburg 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Itfnn 


Ui2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


i|i|2 


I^nnfield 


7 


- 


2 "" 


- 


- 


9 


M alden 


3U5 


wm 


5 


mm 


— 


350 


Manchester 


16 


- 


- 


- 


- 


16 


Mansfield 


21 


- 


- 


- 


- 


21 


Marblehead 


25 


- 


- 


- 


- 


25 


Marion 


U 


? 


- 


- 


- 


11 


Marlboro" 


19 


- 


- 


- 


10 


29 


Marshfield 


25 


- 


- 


- 


- 


25 


M ashpee 


9 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9 


M attapo'is'et't 


- 


3 


- 


m* 


- 


3 


Maynard 


30 


- 


- 


- 


- 


30 


MedfielxT" 


1U 


- 


— 


- 


- 


1U 


Medford 


U5U 


- 


- 


- 


- 


U5U 


Medway 


27 


- 


- 


- 


- 


27 


Melrose 


116 


- 


- 


- 


- 


116 


Methuen 


22 


- 


362 


- 


- 


381; 


Middleboro" 


9 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9 

















Fiscal Year 
1958 - 1959 


BOSTON 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


WORCESTER 


TOTAL 


Middle ton 


1 




1 


_ 


_ 


2 


Milford 


15 


- 


- 


- 


20 


35 


Millbury 


1 


- 


- 


- 


31 


32 r 


Millis 


12 


- 


- 


- 


- 


12 


Milton 


11*0 


- 


- 


- 


- 


l)<0 


Monson 


1 


- 


- 


-13 


- 


Hi 


M ontague 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


l 


Nahant 


11 


„, 


m ^ 


mm 


^. 


11 


Nantucket 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Natick 


13JU 


- 


- 


- 


- 


13U 


Needham 


121 


- 


6 


- 


- 


'127 


New Bedford 


59 


131B 


- 


- 


1 


1,377 


Newbury 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1" 


Newnurypbri 


13 


- 


22 


- 


- 


35 


Newton 


69*; 


- 


U 


tm 


1 


699 


Norfolk 


3 


- 


- 


- 




3 


North Adams 


2 


- 


- 


2 


- 


h 


North Andover 


3 


- 


100 


- 


- 


109 


North Attleboro 


3 


3 


- 


- 


- 


6 


North Brookf ield*" 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


6 


North Reading 


11 


- 


3 


- 


- 


34 


Northampton 


7 


- 


- 


in 


- 


W 


Northboro 


1 


- 


- 


- 


21 


22 


Northbridge 


9 


- 


- 


- 


57 


66 


Northfield ' 


- 


- 


- 


7 


- 


7 


Norton 


2 


10 


- 


- 


- 


12 


Norwell 


2 


- 


mm 


- 


- 


2 


Norwood 


102 


- 


- 


- 


- 


102 


Orange 


3 


mm 


__ 


3 


„, 


6 


Otis 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Oxford 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2U 


2k 


Palmer 


8 


mm 


m m 


h$ 


mm 


S3 


Paxton 


1 


- 


~ 


- 


9 


10 


Peabody 


135 


9 


10 


- 


- 


m 


Pembroke 


15 


- 


- 


mm 


- 


15 


Pepperell 


6 


- 


1 


- 


- 


7 


Petersham 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Phillips ton 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Pittsfield 


11* 


- 


- 


20 


- 


3k 


Plymouth 


79 


- 


- 


- 


- 


79 


Plympton 


U 


- 


- 


- 


- 


h 


Prince ton 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Province town 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Quincy 


Will 


5 




_ 




Uh9 

















' 



Fiscal Year 
1958 - 1959 


BOSTON 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAitflENCE 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


WORCESTER 


TOTc\L 


Randolph 


kk 


mm 


„ 


mm 


mm 


hk 


Raynham 


1 


20 


- 


- 


M 


21 


Reading 


(3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


73 


Rehoboth 


- 


6 


- 


- 


- 


6 


Revere 


256 


- 


- 


- 


2 


25b" 


Rochester 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Rockland 


15 


- 


- 


- 


- 


15 


Rockport 


6 


- 


- 


- 


- 


a 


Rowley- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Russell 


- 


- 


- 


T 


- 


5 


Rutland 


7 


m ^~~ m - 


- 


- 


20 


27 


Salem 


153 


mm 


5 


.. 


.. 


158 


Salisbury 


- 


- 


l 


- 


- 


1 


Saugus 


uo 


- 


l 


- 


- 


ifl." 


ScituaTe 


69 


2 


■M 


- 


- 


71 


Sharon 


60 


- 


- 


- 


- 


60 


Shelburhe 


1 


- 


- 


- 


mm 


1 


Sherborn 


h 


- 


- 


MM 


- 


u 


Shirley 


n 


- 


- 


- 


- 


11 


Shrewsbury 


2 


- 


- 


- 


136 


13a 


Somerset 


h 


119 


- 


- 


- 


123 


Scmerville 


9U6 


- 


1 


- 


- 


9^7 


South Hadley 


- 


- 


- 


m 


- 


UU 


Southampton 


2 


- 


- 


h 


- 


6 


Southboro 


h 


- 


- 


- 


1 


5 


Southbridge 


30 


- 


- 


l 


71 


102 


Southwick 


- 


- 


- 


9 


- 


9 


Spencer 


3 


- 


3 


- 


U6 


' 52 


Springfield' 


35 


- 


- 


2316 


- 


2,351 


Sterling 


- 


- 


- 


- 


U 


U 


StockbricTge 


2 


- 


- 


3 


- 


5 


Stoneham 


66 


- 


- 


- 


- 


66 


S tough ton 


Ul 


- 


- 


- 




ill 


Stow 


12 


- 


- 


— 


- 


12 


Sturbridge 


1 


- 


— 


2 


1 


h 


Sudbury 


K 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17 


Sutton 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Swamps co tt" 


37 


- 


- 


- 


- 


37 ' 


Swansea 


1 


92 


- 


- 


- 


93 


Taunton 


2k 


129 








153 


Temple toii 


a 


- 


- 


- 


3 


11 


Tewksbury 


9 


- 


10 


- 


- 


19 


Topsfield 


15 


- 


£ 


- 


- 


l?" 


I^ngsboro 


3 


- 


2 


- 


— 


5 


[fyringham 


mm 


- 


- 


1 


- 


l 


Upton 
Uxbri'dge 


1 


mm 


_ 


mm 


Ik 


15 


3 


- 


- 


— 


19 


22 

















Fiscal loar 
1958 - 1959 



Wakefield^ 

Walpole " 

Waltham 
Ware 



Wareham 
Warren " 



Watertown 

Wayland 

Webster 

We lies ley 

Wellfleet" 

Wenham 



West Boylsto n 
West Bridgewater 
Yfest Springfield" 

We s tb or o " 

Westfield 

Westford 

Weston 



WestporT 
Westwood" 
Weymouth" 
WhatelyJ 
Whitman"" 



Wi3Jbrahan 
Y/i3mington_ 
Winchendon" 
Winchester" 

Winthrop [ 

Woburn 



Worcester 
Wrentham 



Yarmouth 



Out of State 
TOTAL 



BOSTON 



6U 

W 



T 



FALL 
RIVER 



1? 



"U7T 

T7" 



T2T 



T 
T 



7 



12 

TT 



39 



31 
loT 



19 



IF 
T 



w 
7J 



71 



327 



25,555 



13 



LAWRENCE 



SPRING- 
FIELD 



WORCESTER 



2 



TT 



w 



TF 



T5F 



T 



"BT" 



T5T 



33 



TT 



I*, 173 



"W 



TT 



10 



3,7)48 



"m£o" 



lOi; 



3,996 



10 



5,677 



Tom 



6U 

TT 

Tine - 



9 
TJ7T~ 



121 



1 
2 



"oT 



1 
US" 



"5T - 



IF 

39 
If 



"31 
105 



19 

TT 



TJJ 



W 



73 



^ 71 



fagl 



U3,lh9 



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